Creative Commons licenses and the non-commercial condition: Implications for the re-use of biodiversity information

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Citation: Gregor Hagedorn, Daniel Mietchen, Robert A. Morris, Donat Agosti, Lyubomir Penev, Walter G. Berendsohn, Donald Hobern (2011-11-28) Creative Commons licenses and the non-commercial condition: Implications for the re-use of biodiversity information. ZooKeys (RSS)

doi: 10.3897/zookeys.150.2189

Download: http://www.pensoft.net/journals/zookeys/article/2189/abstract/creative-commons-licenses-and-the-non-commercial-condition-implications-for-the-re-use-of-biodiversity-information

Tagged: Creative Commons (RSS), copyright (RSS), biodiversity information (RSS), open access (RSS)


Summary:

Authors give a brief overview of copyright as barrier to sharing of biodiversity information, Open Access and public copyright licenses such as those provided by Creative Commons (CC) as partial solutions. CC licenses with the NonCommercial (NC) term do not grant permission for commercial uses. Authors review uncertainty around what constitutes "commercial use", problems of incompatibility with other widely used CC licenses and lack of full openness of NC condition. Authors recommend CC rename/rebrand and add visual and explanatory cues to the NC licenses to distinguish them from fully open licenses, and to pursue clarification of the NC definition. Finally, while authors consider NC a valid choice, they say it is not appropriate for publicly funded research, and urge other would-be NC licensors to carefully weigh the costs and benefits, including socially, of using an NC license rather than a fully open one.

Theoretical and practical relevance:

OA is burgeoning, authors and especially policymakers ought be informed about implications of terms research products offered under. Paper contributes to assessment that NC restriction not appropriate. May be first academic publication to comment on CC's future version 4.0 licenses and make recommendations for same.